LATEST HEALTH NEWS

In this section we will keep you up to date with all the latest health conditions effecting the breed and keep you informed of all the great work being done to overcome these conditions worldwide.

If you would like to be a part of some of these studies then please do get hold of the people doing them after all this is a breed we love and need to help.


                              LYMPHATIC CANCER STUDY

To take part in Dr Mj Hamiltons  worldwide Lymphatic cancer study, and you have a purebred bordeaux,  just contact us and we will pass on his email address to you and MJ will send you a swab kit over to you if it an easy thing to do and can be very very beneficial to the health of our breed in the future in helping locate the gene responsible for causing this horrid condition.



                                  WORLDWIDE HEALTH STUDY

Have you lost a ddb? If you have then  PLEASE, we beg you, complete the cause of death survey at www.ddbsa.org , it will help us understand what's taking our beloved dogues from us. The Dogues & us hank you!



                        NORMAL DDB ECHOCARDIOGRAPH

J Small Anim Pract. 2011 May;52(5):246-53

Echocardiographic values in clinically healthy adult dogue de Bordeaux dogs.Locatelli C, Santini A, Bonometti GA, Palermo V, Scarpa P, Sala E, Brambilla PG. SourceFaculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Veterinary Clinical Science, University of Milan, Italy.


OBJECTIVES:

To assess the influence of body surface area, age and gender on echocardiographic parameters and to establish echocardiographic reference values for dogue de Bordeaux dogs.


METHODS:

Thirty-nine healthy dogue de Bordeaux dogs of both sexes, older than one year, were recruited and 31 of these were included in the study. The classic linear regression model proved to be the best way to analyse the data. The reference limits of the echocardiographic measurements were calculated using the regression equations. The difference between the mean values of body surface area in both gender groups was evaluated by using one-way ANOVA.


RESULTS:

A significant correlation was seen between several echocardiographic parameters and body surface area or body surface area and age, and high coefficients of determination (R2) were found. No effect of gender was detected on echocardiographic variables, except for the thickness of the left ventricular posterior wall at end diastole.


CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE:

The echocardiographic parameters related to body surface area, in the absence of correlation with other independent variables (gender and age) should be interpreted with caution because their variation could be significant for the presence of heart disease. The proposed statistical model allows estimation of echocardiographic parameters in dogue de Bordeaux dogs with different body surface areas and ages.

© 2011 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.



                               KIDNEY DISEASE

                 By Mj Hamilton ( DDBSA Health Committee


                  J Vet Intern Med. 2010 Mar-Apr;24(2):314-22.

Progressive juvenile glomerulonephropathy in 16 related French Mastiff (Bordeaux) dogs. Lavoué R, van der Lugt JJ, Day MJ, Georges M, Busoni V, Merveille AC, Poujade A, Peeters D. Department of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences , Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium. [email protected]


Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Familial juvenile glomerulonephropathy (JGN) is reported in several breeds of dogs. The mode of inheritance and spectrum of pathological lesions vary among breeds. A progressive JGN was detected in a pedigree of French Mastiff (FM) dogs.


OBJECTIVES:

To describe clinical, laboratory, and histopathologic findings in related FM dogs suffering from progressive JGN and to determine the mode of inheritance of this condition.


ANIMALS:

Sixteen affected and 35 healthy related FM dogs


METHODS:

FM dogs < 24 months of age and diagnosed with chronic kidney disease with evidence of proteinuria entered the study. Clinical, laboratory, histopathologic findings, and pedigree data were recorded.


RESULTS:

Clinical signs were typical of progressive glomerulopathy with resultant renal failure. Increased blood urea nitrogen, creatinine and total cholesterol concentrations, and proteinuria were found in all patients. Affected dogs had abnormal kidney structure on abdominal ultrasound examination. Histopathologic examination revealed extensive cystic glomerular atrophy, glomerular hypercellularity, and capillary wall thickening without immune complex deposition when tested with immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescence. Electron microscopy did not disclose specific primary glomerular lesions. Mean age at death was 20 months and mean length of survival after diagnosis was 6 months. Both males and females from healthy parents were affected. An autosomal recessive mode of transmission is suspected, but a more complex mode of inheritance cannot be excluded.


CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE:

Progressive familial JGN occurs in FM dogs. Characterization of the pathogenesis and mode of inheritance of this disease warrants additional study.


                            OFA HIP SCORING VS PENNHIP
                                        Thanks to Mj Hamilton


Evaluation of the relationship between Orthopedic Foundation for Animals’ hip joint scores and PennHIP distraction index values in dogs


Michelle Y. Powers, DVM, DACVS; Georga T. Karbe, Med vet; Thomas P. Gregor, BS; Pamela McKelvie, VMD; William T. N. Culp, VMD, DACVS; Hilary H. Fordyce, VMD; Gail K. Smith, VMD, Ph


Objective—To compare 2 screening methods for detecting evidence of hip dysplasia (Or- thopedic Foundation for Animals [OFA] and PennHIP) in dogs.

Design—Diagnostic test evaluation study. Animals—439 dogs ␣ 24 months of age that received routine hip joint screening from June 1987 through July 2008.


Procedures—Dogs were sedated, and PennHIP radiography was performed (hip joint– extended [HE], compression, and distraction radiographic views). The HE radiographic view was submitted for OFA evaluation. A copy of the HE radiographic view plus the compres- sion and distraction radiographic views were submitted for routine PennHIP evaluation, including quantification of hip joint laxity via the distraction index (DI).


Results—14% (60/439) of dogs had hip joints scored as excellent by OFA standards; how- ever, 52% (31/60) of those had a DI ␣ 0.30 (range, 0.14 to 0.61). Eighty-two percent of (183/223) dogs with OFA-rated good hip joints had a DI ␣ 0.30 (range, 0.10 to 0.77), and 94% (79/84) of dogs with OFA-rated fair hip joints had a DI ␣ 0.30 (range, 0.14 to 0.77). Of all dogs with fair to excellent hip joints by OFA standards, 80% (293/367) had a DI ␣ 0.30. All dogs with OFA-rated borderline hip joints or mild, moderate, or severe hip dysplasia had a DI ␣ 0.30 (range, 0.30 to 0.83).


Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Dogs judged as phenotypically normal by the OFA harbored clinically important passive hip joint laxity as determined via distraction radiogra- phy. Results suggested that OFA scoring of HE radiographs underestimated susceptibility to osteoarthritis in dogs, which may impede progress in reducing or eliminating hip dyspla- sia through breeding. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2010;237:532–541)


       


                      Penn Hip Evaluation

       The following info explaining PennHip thanks to Kris Munday


There are THREE aspects to Penn Hip "rating" or "scoring", the Distraction Ind...ex (DI), the presence or absence of Degenerative Joint Disease (DJD) & the breed percentile. There are 3 x-rays that are taken, an "extended view" with the legs extended, the "compressed view" where the hips are pushed into the sockets, and the "distracted view" where the hips are pulled out of their socket. 


The Distraction Index (measurement) is the percentage a dogs hips come out of the socket when distracted. So, this means that if a dog is a .50/.50, the dogs hips come 50% out of the socket when distracted, if a dog is .28/.38, one hip comes out 28%, one comes out 38% when distracted..... The higher the DI, the worse the dogs hips are........... Dogs over .30/.30 do have a greater risk at developing DJD as they age. 


The 3 different views give the overall view of the hips and they can tell if there is Degenerative Joint Disease present or not.
The final is the breed percentile, where the dog falls in with the rest of the breed that has been Penn Hip tested. They take the best breed score and the worst breed score and create a scale. This tells you where your dog falls within it's breed, hip wise. 


For the Dogue de Bordeaux, as of 5/10, the lowest score was a .28, the highest was a 1.12, mean/average score was .67. So, that dog that is a .50/.50 DI would fall within the top 10% of ddb's tested and is in the 90th percentile meaning it's hips are better than 90% of the ddb's tested to date. A dog with a .91/.91 would fall in the 10th percentile, meaning 90% of the dogues tested had better hips. Dogs below the 50th percentile, it's not recommended that they be bred.


In this section we will keep you up to date with all the latest health conditions effecting the breed and keep you informed of all the great work being done to overcome these conditions worldwide.

If you would like to be a part of some of these studies then please do get hold of the people doing them after all this is a breed we love and need to help.

 

                      LYMPHATIC CANCER STUDY

 

To take part in Dr Mj Hamiltons  worldwide Lymphatic cancer study, and you have a purebred bordeaux,  just contact us and we will pass on his email address to you and MJ will send you a swab kit over to you if it an easy thing to do and can be very very beneficial to the health of our breed in the future in helping locate the gene responsible for causing this horrid condition.

  

                     WORLDWIDE HEALTH STUDY

 

Have you lost a ddb? If you have then  PLEASE, we beg you, complete the cause of death survey at www.ddbsa.org , it will help us understand what's taking our beloved dogues from us. The Dogues & us hank you!

 

            NORMAL DDB ECHOCARDIOGRAPH

 

J Small Anim Pract. 2011 May;52(5):246-53

Echocardiographic values in clinically healthy adult dogue de Bordeaux dogs. Locatelli C, Santini A, Bonometti GA, Palermo V, Scarpa P, Sala E, Brambilla PG. SourceFaculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Veterinary Clinical Science, University of Milan, Italy.

OBJECTIVES:

To assess the influence of body surface area, age and gender on echocardiographic parameters and to establish echocardiographic reference values for dogue de Bordeaux dogs.

METHODS:

Thirty-nine healthy dogue de Bordeaux dogs of both sexes, older than one year, were recruited and 31 of these were included in the study. The classic linear regression model proved to be the best way to analyse the data. The reference limits of the echocardiographic measurements were calculated using the regression equations. The difference between the mean values of body surface area in both gender groups was evaluated by using one-way ANOVA.

RESULTS:

A significant correlation was seen between several echocardiographic parameters and body surface area or body surface area and age, and high coefficients of determination (R2) were found. No effect of gender was detected on echocardiographic variables, except for the thickness of the left ventricular posterior wall at end diastole.

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE:

The echocardiographic parameters related to body surface area, in the absence of correlation with other independent variables (gender and age) should be interpreted with caution because their variation could be significant for the presence of heart disease. The proposed statistical model allows estimation of echocardiographic parameters in dogue de Bordeaux dogs with different body surface areas and ages.

© 2011 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

 

                                KIDNEY DISEASE

                     By Mj Hamilton ( DDBSA Health Committee

J Vet Intern Med. 2010 Mar-Apr;24(2):314-22.

Progressive juvenile glomerulonephropathy in 16 related French Mastiff (Bordeaux) dogs. Lavoué R, van der Lugt JJ, Day MJ, Georges M, Busoni V, Merveille AC, Poujade A, Peeters D. Department of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences , Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium. [email protected]

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Familial juvenile glomerulonephropathy (JGN) is reported in several breeds of dogs. The mode of inheritance and spectrum of pathological lesions vary among breeds. A progressive JGN was detected in a pedigree of French Mastiff (FM) dogs.

OBJECTIVES:

To describe clinical, laboratory, and histopathologic findings in related FM dogs suffering from progressive JGN and to determine the mode of inheritance of this condition.

ANIMALS:

Sixteen affected and 35 healthy related FM dogs

METHODS:

FM dogs < 24 months of age and diagnosed with chronic kidney disease with evidence of proteinuria entered the study. Clinical, laboratory, histopathologic findings, and pedigree data were recorded.

RESULTS:

Clinical signs were typical of progressive glomerulopathy with resultant renal failure. Increased blood urea nitrogen, creatinine and total cholesterol concentrations, and proteinuria were found in all patients. Affected dogs had abnormal kidney structure on abdominal ultrasound examination. Histopathologic examination revealed extensive cystic glomerular atrophy, glomerular hypercellularity, and capillary wall thickening without immune complex deposition when tested with immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescence. Electron microscopy did not disclose specific primary glomerular lesions. Mean age at death was 20 months and mean length of survival after diagnosis was 6 months. Both males and females from healthy parents were affected. An autosomal recessive mode of transmission is suspected, but a more complex mode of inheritance cannot be excluded.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE:

Progressive familial JGN occurs in FM dogs. Characterization of the pathogenesis and mode of inheritance of this disease warrants additional study.

 

                  OFA HIP SCORING VS PENNHIP

                                    Thanks to Mj Hamilton 

Evaluation of the relationship between Orthopedic Foundation for Animals’ hip joint scores and PennHIP distraction index values in dogs

 Michelle Y. Powers, DVM, DACVS; Georga T. Karbe, Med vet; Thomas P. Gregor, BS; Pamela McKelvie, VMD; William T. N. Culp, VMD, DACVS; Hilary H. Fordyce, VMD; Gail K. Smith, VMD, PhD

 

Objective—To compare 2 screening methods for detecting evidence of hip dysplasia (Or- thopedic Foundation for Animals [OFA] and PennHIP) in dogs.

Design—Diagnostic test evaluation study. Animals—439 dogs ␣ 24 months of age that received routine hip joint screening from June

1987 through July 2008.

Procedures—Dogs were sedated, and PennHIP radiography was performed (hip joint– extended [HE], compression, and distraction radiographic views). The HE radiographic view was submitted for OFA evaluation. A copy of the HE radiographic view plus the compres- sion and distraction radiographic views were submitted for routine PennHIP evaluation, including quantification of hip joint laxity via the distraction index (DI).

Results—14% (60/439) of dogs had hip joints scored as excellent by OFA standards; how- ever, 52% (31/60) of those had a DI ␣ 0.30 (range, 0.14 to 0.61). Eighty-two percent of (183/223) dogs with OFA-rated good hip joints had a DI ␣ 0.30 (range, 0.10 to 0.77), and 94% (79/84) of dogs with OFA-rated fair hip joints had a DI ␣ 0.30 (range, 0.14 to 0.77). Of all dogs with fair to excellent hip joints by OFA standards, 80% (293/367) had a DI ␣ 0.30. All dogs with OFA-rated borderline hip joints or mild, moderate, or severe hip dysplasia had a DI ␣ 0.30 (range, 0.30 to 0.83).

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Dogs judged as phenotypically normal by the OFA harbored clinically important passive hip joint laxity as determined via distraction radiogra- phy. Results suggested that OFA scoring of HE radiographs underestimated susceptibility to osteoarthritis in dogs, which may impede progress in reducing or eliminating hip dyspla- sia through breeding. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2010;237:532–541)

                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

           The following info explaining PennHip thanks to Kris Munday

 There are THREE aspects to Penn Hip "rating" or "scoring", the Distraction Ind...ex (DI), the presence or absence of Degenerative Joint Disease (DJD) & the breed percentile. There are 3 x-rays that are taken, an "extended view" with the legs extended, the "compressed view" where the hips are pushed into the sockets, and the "distracted view" where the hips are pulled out of their socket.
The Distraction Index (measurement) is the percentage a dogs hips come out of the socket when distracted. So, this means that if a dog is a .50/.50, the dogs hips come 50% out of the socket when distracted, if a dog is .28/.38, one hip comes out 28%, one comes out 38% when distracted..... The higher the DI, the worse the dogs hips are........... Dogs over .30/.30 do have a greater risk at developing DJD as they age.
The 3 different views give the overall view of the hips and they can tell if there is Degenerative Joint Disease present or not.
The final is the breed percentile, where the dog falls in with the rest of the breed that has been Penn Hip tested. They take the best breed score and the worst breed score and create a scale. This tells you where your dog falls within it's breed, hip wise.
For the Dogue de Bordeaux, as of 5/10, the lowest score was a .28, the highest was a 1.12, mean/average score was .67. So, that dog that is a .50/.50 DI would fall within the top 10% of ddb's tested and is in the 90th percentile meaning it's hips are better than 90% of the ddb's tested to date. A dog with a .91/.91 would fall in the 10th percentile, meaning 90% of the dogues tested had better hips. Dogs below the 50th percentile, it's not recommended that they be bred.

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